Resourceful Wrens

A house wren singing from the top of a fence post near his nest in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

A pair of house wrens has made a nest in a pipe on the fence around The Bison and Elk Enclosure. The nest is in a busy location next to the Nature Playscape. The end of the pipe is 7 feet or more above the ground.

I noticed a house wren singing from the top of a fence post in late May. One morning in early June after finishing his song, he flew from the top of the fence post to the opening of the pipe and disappeared inside!

Last Saturday, I watched their early morning activity. The male house wren sings from the fence posts and the nearby trees to declare his territory and signal to the female wren that it is safe to enter and leave the nest. They were still at the nest site when I walked by it on Monday morning.

June 16, 2018

A house wren at her nest in a pipe on the fence around The Bison and Elk Enclosure in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

A house wren entering and leaving her nest in a pipe on the fence around The Bison and Elk Enclosure in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

A house wren watching from the top of a fence post near his nest in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

A house wren watching from the top of a fence post near his nest in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

A house wren singing and watching from the top of a fence post near his nest in Jester Park, Iowa, June 16, 2018.

June 17, 2018

The pipe with the house wren nest on the fence around The Bison and Elk Enclosure in Jester Park, Iowa, June 17, 2018.

June 18, 2018

A house wren in a tree near his nest in Jester Park, Iowa, June 18, 2018.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

 

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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15 Responses to Resourceful Wrens

  1. Shady_Grady says:

    It is really interesting that every single species has some section of the world which is theirs, as far as they are concerned, even as they are blissfully ignorant of other claims. As far as those wrens are concerned that area of the planet is all theirs. 🙂

    Those are really good pics. You can almost feel like you were there.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked seeing the wrens and felt like you were there. 🙂

      That is their spot! Make no mistake about it. 🙂 I don’t think they were very happy about me setting up the tripod and camera about 8 feet from their nest and watching for an hour or so. The area gets very busy, though, during the day. It is a playground for children made from natural features and materials. There is a large sandy area about 20 feet east of the pipe. The main play area is up steps made from logs. People also walk their dogs on a path by the fence there. I was concerned about them and their nest when I first noticed the wren disappearing into the pipe. I was happy to see that it seems to be working out alright for them.

  2. urzre says:

    Very beautiful!

  3. zirah1 says:

    Great pictures and videos and I love how resourceful the wrens were for finding housing. I’m glad you actually showed them coming and going from the pipe, because otherwise I wouldn’t have thought they could squeeze thru that little opening between the pipe and the post, but they had no problem at all.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed seeing the little wrens. 🙂 When I first saw the male wren go in the end of the pipe, I thought…. Hmm…. That’s curious. 🙂 Then, I made a point of watching the area and sure enough there was a pair visiting the spot. It has been raining in the mornings since Monday so I haven’t been out to check on them since then. Hopefully, they will be successful in raising their family. The entrance to the pipe is at least 7 feet and maybe more like 8 feet from the ground which keeps it a bit protected from intruders.

  4. Hi Sarah, beautiful photographs! These wrens look huge compared to the tiny little ones we get here in our garden in England 🙂

    • Sarah says:

      Hi 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked seeing the wrens. 🙂 According to the bird book I have, the house wrens are about 4 1/2 inches. I think it would be interesting to see the young ones. They will likely leave the nest while no one is about, though, including me. 🙂

  5. Gosh, you captured these tiny birds but don’t they have loud voices and harsh cries if an intruder is near.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! They are cute little birds with big personalities. 🙂

      I was about 10 or more feet away. They were keeping an eye on me, but still went about their business. It is a busy area. Behind where I was with the camera, there is a sandy patch which is part of the Nature Playscape. There are wooden steps that go almost to where the end of the pipe is located. In the daytime, there are children playing, people walking by and people walking their dogs as well. The end of the pipe with the nest is about 8 feet above the ground. I think this is why they have been successful with it. Those not paying attention probably miss the fact that there is a nest there at all. I heard and saw the house wren singing. I know that they sing near their nest so I was on the look out. I was very surprised when I realized the nest was in the pipe. 🙂 The pair are on to their second brood now. For a while, the house wren wasn’t singing in the garden. This last week, though, he was back and I saw the pair of them coming and going from the pipe again. I would love to see the little ones, but I think that is unlikely.

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