Blue

An indigo bunting in the bushes near the entrance to the woods in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

The blue sky pulled up the covers and slept in on the third Sunday in May. The woods echoed with the tap, tap, tap of the woodpeckers and the songs of the birds. The plants have grown rapidly in the first month of warm weather this year creating many hiding places for the birds and the other small animals.

A house wren sang from the fence around the bison and the elk enclosure to claim his territory. By the entrance to the woods, an indigo bunting searched for his breakfast in the bushes.

A hairy woodpecker in the woods in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

Birdsong and the tapping of woodpeckers in the woods in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

A house wren singing from the fence around the bison and the elk enclosure at Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

A house wren perched on the fence around the bison and the elk enclosure in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

An indigo bunting in the bushes near the entrance to the woods in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

An indigo bunting in the bushes near the entrance to the woods in Jester Park, Iowa, May 20, 2018.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

 

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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20 Responses to Blue

  1. Really gorgeous birds, Sarah. The video of the tapping woodpeckers, sounds so musical…thanks for sharing and a lovely write too! It’s so nice to have that kind of surrounds and nature to enjoy! Have a great day. πŸ™‚ ❀

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Iris πŸ™‚
      Thank you for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the sights and the sounds of the Sunday morning. πŸ™‚ It was cloudy, cool, and breezy and very peaceful. The birds were active and chattering and singing away. I noticed the indigo bunting because he was chirping as he looked for his breakfast. I think I caught a glimpse of his mate for a brief moment. I like to stand still in the woods to listen and watch. Now that the leaves are out on the trees, I don’t often see the birds. I could hear them all around me like the leaves were singing and chirping. πŸ™‚ I hope you have a wonderful day as well! πŸ™‚ ❀

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    Very cool pictures as always Sarah. They look like pieces of art.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked seeing the pictures. πŸ™‚ I love looking at the expressions of the birds. The house wren had his “This is my space!” look. The indigo bunting’s look was more inquisitive: “Who are you?” πŸ™‚

  3. zirah1 says:

    Wow, the coloring of that bunting looks almost artificial it’s so intense. And I love the pic of the wren all puffed up. Birds are always a little more comical/sweet looking to me when they are doing that, although I guess they are usually just trying to stay warm. p.s. It’s looking absolutely jungle-y around here this past week w/ the combination of rain, sunshine and warmer temps.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed seeing the birds. πŸ™‚ It was a chilly morning for late spring with the temperature in the middle 50s. I imagine the wren was trying to keep warm. The house wrens are favorites. πŸ™‚ Tiny birds with big personalities!

      I was surprised the first time I saw an indigo bunting last year. Most of the birds around here have patches of bright colors mixed with more muted tones. I saw a brief glimpse of a scarlet tanager last year in the woods. He looked very bright. And there are the northern cardinals who are cousins of the indigo buntings. There aren’t nearly as many indigo buntings as cardinals and they are smaller and shy. I am hoping that I will see him again out in the open. It is all about luck with the birds. πŸ™‚ They have their own way of doing things and don’t let me know about their plans.

      The plants have grown very fast here as well. It is hard to believe now how sparse it looked in middle and late April. I am over-joyed at being able to have my windows open and spend time outside! πŸ™‚

  4. Most excellent shots, Sarah! Brava! You are so good with birds and just looking at what you have here is assisting me to learn more about bird photography. I really enjoyed your post today and I so appreciate all the work you put into doing it. May you have a glorious day today. Much Love to you, dear friend! πŸ’•πŸŒΉπŸ’•

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Amy πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed seeing the little birds. πŸ™‚ I find them endlessly interesting and I am happy when they let me into their world for a moment or two. I have been to this park enough to know a couple of places where the birds can sometimes be found. I check them when I have the bird lens on. This morning, I went by the spot where I saw the indigo bunting on Sunday and the birds were elsewhere. I saw a few other things which are worth investigating later. I like to stand still in various spots and listen and observe. It was very nice to spend time outside drinking in the fresh air! I hope you have a fun weekend and have time to experiment with your new camera and lenses. πŸ™‚ ❀

      • You are getting my juices going, Sarah, as I await monies owed me for the 3 lenses I am selling to put towards my new camera. This is the camera I have every intention of using my 100-400mm lens with due to the type of sensor it has that bumps up the highest mm to 640mm. I’ve been really seeing some very very interesting birds that I just look so forward to capturing. Yes it is nice just to stop, be still and observe what our feathered friends are doing. Have a great holiday weekend! πŸ’

        • Sarah says:

          I am looking forward to seeing the birds and other nature wonders you find with your new camera! I hope you enjoy the holiday weekend as well. πŸ™‚ ❀

  5. kp says:

    thank you for the indigo bunting Sarah – that really IS a special blue — as if the bird has emerged from the tail of a peacock, perhaps?

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed seeing the indigo bunting. πŸ™‚ He is really blue. πŸ™‚ I was surprised when I saw one for the first time last year. Most of the birds around here have feathers with muted colors or mostly muted colors with splashes of bright colors. The exceptions are the northern cardinal and the goldfinch. The bluebirds have bright blue like the indigo buntings on their backs. The indigo buntings like to sit on the top of the tallest tree around and sing like their cousins the northern cardinals. I was lucky to find this little bird looking for insects in the bushes and small trees before all of the leaves came out.

  6. Amazing colours and although wrens are common we certainly don’t have indigo birds. I wonder why there are such colourful common birds like this one and the cardinal in the northern USA. They look so tropical!

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! The indigo buntings are an amazing color blue. πŸ™‚ I saw one for the first time last year. I was really surprised. I looked him up when I got home to find out his name. The indigo buntings are in the same family as the cardinals and the red-breasted grosbeaks. I saw a red-breasted grosbeak a few times last year, but not this year yet. Another brightly colored bird that lives here in the summer is the scarlet tanager. I have only see one once. It was last year and the bird was high up in a tree in the woods before the leaves had fully come out. An indigo bunting was serenading me this morning when I was out taking flower photos. πŸ™‚ He was perched on the very top of a tree which they like to do.

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