Golden Wings

They catch the light in their golden wings changing hues like the rising sun.

The Monarch butterfly migration through this area peaked in the third week of September. I found a few feeding and resting in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake.

These Monarch butterflies will overwinter in trees about 2000 miles to the south in Mexico. TheΒ US Forest Service has a web page with information about Monarch migration and links to maps for both fall and spring migration sightings.

September 21, 2017

A Monarch butterfly in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 21, 2017.

A Monarch butterfly in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 21, 2017.

A Monarch butterfly in the wildflowers near the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 21, 2017.

A Monarch butterfly in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 21, 2017.

A Monarch butterfly in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 21, 2017.

September 24, 2017

A Monarch butterfly in the Butterfly Garden at Saylorville Lake, Iowa, September 24, 2017.

Take care and thanks for visiting.

Sarah

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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21 Responses to Golden Wings

  1. Absolutely BEAUTIFUL photo’s!!! I love butterflies. I have butterfly bushes in our yard. Thanks for sharing!

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Diane πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked the photos. πŸ™‚ I love butterflies as well. I am happy I can take photos of them to look at when they have left for the year. It was a lot of fun to watch them when they were migrating through. πŸ™‚ I love how their wings change shades of orange and yellow depending on the sunlight.

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    Hey what do you know, a new post! I never really thought about where the butterflies go in the fall. It’s amazing that they travel so far. Those are really colorful pics.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the photos and the post. πŸ™‚ From what I have read, different butterflies have different ways of surviving the cold weather. There are other butterflies that migrate shorter distances than the Monarchs. It is beyond amazing to me how far the Monarchs travel and how they overwinter in the same places even through they have never been there before.

  3. zirah1 says:

    Some of your best pics yet! Love the way the colors of the flowers in the first couple of photos and the last one compliment the butterfly’s colors. And then the blue in the other pics is such a nice, striking contrast. Just lovely. I know you were so glad to have some monarch sightings.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked the photos. πŸ™‚ I was thinking the same thing as you about the colors of the flowers complimenting the butterfly. πŸ™‚ I have to look up the name of the blue wildflowers. They bloomed at the end of the summer just in time for the Monarchs. The Monarch in the last photo was staying almost perfectly still. Perhaps, he was warming up. It was the perfect pose and I whispered a quiet “Thank you!” πŸ™‚

  4. Such a lovely post – and I really enjoyed the video as I don’t get Monarchs visiting my garden (its mainly Cabbage Whites munching on my cabbages…) Great to catch up on your blog again too πŸ™‚

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the post. πŸ™‚ I love the Monarchs. It astounds me that they travel about 2000 miles from here to their wintering over spot and then come back. I don’t see as many of them traveling through or flying around in the spring and summer. They seem to be more spread out. In September, though, Wow! They are everywhere and such a delight to watch. πŸ™‚ I had no idea when I moved here that I would be treated to this wonder. I enjoyed your new post this morning. I read it while drinking the wake up cup of tea and thought about how interesting it would be to have traveled where you did. I am looking forward to more sights from your summer travels. πŸ™‚

      • Thanks Sarah πŸ™‚ You’re right, I do have a whole summer of posts to write up – and this is my first year writing a personal website (I normally write for charities, not myself) – so I’m really looking forward to nesting in the colder months, writing and reminiscing about our travels. I’m so glad I found your blog, it’s always a brilliant read.

  5. Such beautiful photos, Sarah! Your blog is a delight to visit…. I can ‘t see anywhere I can like your post? Have a wonderful season and take care. β™₯️ πŸ™‚

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Iris πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the photos. πŸ™‚ The Monarch butterflies have started arriving at their wintering over spot. I checked the other day. This is a good thing since winter has come early here. It is cold and frosty and time for hats, mittens, and warm coats. I think about the butterflies collected together in the trees and look forward to their return in the spring. πŸ™‚ Thanks for the tip about the like button. I will look through the settings and see where it went. Thank you for your happy wishes. πŸ™‚ I hope you have a joyful season as well. πŸ™‚ ❀

  6. Such clarity of focus, very beautiful. It’s an amazing migration and you’ve captured the drama!

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Georgina πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed seeing the Monarchs. πŸ™‚ It is amazing to me that they travel so far on their fragile wings and then come back in the spring. There is a two to three week spell in September when I see them everywhere. It is really something. πŸ™‚

  7. stbarbebaker says:

    Oh to see the monarch migration would be divine. I’ve only seen pictures. The butterflies are so much fewer every year here it is sad. The songbirds are so much fewer. Thank you there is hope for the butterflies when you can still post pics like these

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! The Monarchs are a sight to behold. πŸ™‚ I didn’t know when I moved here that I was going to be treated to such a wonder. When they come through, they are everywhere. I talk to them when I see them crossing the road in front of my car and tell them to be careful! πŸ™‚ I am an optimist. I don’t think it is too late for humans to find a way to live in harmony with the rest of the natural world. Education and personal interactions build enthusiasm especially in the young. Every little bit counts. πŸ™‚

      • stbarbebaker says:

        The migration does sound to good to be true. What a wonderful message to send to them. In this day of technology it is too bad vehicles can’t have a fan or air pressure differential or some type of force field or vacuum to scoop the butterflies up and over and swing them to the side. So many are on the fronts of vehicles after a highway journey it is terrifically tragic in this day of technology yes harmony would be fantastic. Yes. Children of the green earth a wonderful plan

        • Sarah says:

          I was going for a walk at lunchtime during September a few years back when I counted 12 Monarch butterflies in a half hour. I sat on a bench in the warm late summer sun and watched them thinking “How could I be so lucky?!?” πŸ™‚ When I got home, I looked up their migration route and this area is right in the middle of it. Now, I make a point to go out to the park to watch them in September. It would be nice to have butterfly and bird safe cars!

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