Courage

This year’s new arrivals are learning the skills they need to survive.

A young cowbird rocked back and forth on the back of a bison while the bison grazed. A female American redstart looked for insects in the grass near the woods.

Over by Saylorville Lake, a dickcissel traded chirps with a fellow youngster. He waved in the wind holding on to his perch with determination and courage while waiting for his flock to return.

August 18, 2017

A young cowbird balancing on the back of a bison at Jester Park, Iowa, August 18, 2017.

August 19, 2017

A young female American Redstart near the entrance to the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, August 19, 2017.

A young female American Redstart near the entrance to the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, August 19, 2017.

August 25, 2017

A young Dickcissel near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, August 25, 2017.

A young Dickcissel near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, August 25, 2017.

A young Dickcissel near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, August 25, 2017.

A young Dickcissel near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, August 25, 2017.

A young Dickcissel on a windy day near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, August 25, 2017.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

 

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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19 Responses to Courage

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Belinda 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the photos. 🙂 The young birds are fun to watch. A few of them were kind enough to pose for a photo. 🙂

  1. Shady_Grady says:

    Very impressive photography! I like the Redstart pics.The colors seem to leap off the screen.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked the photos. 🙂

      The young Restart breezed by me and landed on the fence when I was walking to the woods. I tried to take a photograph of an adult female Restart earlier in the summer when I was watching the Wrens, but didn’t manage to find her in the leaves. The female and the male Restarts look very different. The young birds still have their youthful puffiness at this time of the year.

  2. birdlady612 says:

    Love the photos! We have so many young birds trying to be courageous. We also have some rather large baby birds who are capable of feeding themselves, but are still begging for their parents to feed them. They are so fun to watch. 🙋🐦

    • Sarah says:

      Hi 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you had fun looking at the photos. 🙂 The young birds are fun to watch: fluffy, curious, and hungry! 🙂 Hopefully, they all eat up as much as they can to be ready for winter.

  3. zirah1 says:

    Great pics…..love the ones of the cowbird bird all puffed up on the bison and the Redstarts. Wonder why they are called Redstarts when all I see is yellow? 🙂

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah 🙂

      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked the photos and the cute little cowbird. 🙂 He looked so tiny on the top of the bison. The bison didn’t seem particularly concerned about him being there. It was pretty funny actually to watch the bison walking around with a little bird on his back. 🙂 The bison was near the fence and half hidden behind the grass so I couldn’t get a picture with both of them.

      The male American Restart has orange-red or red-orange patches on his wings and tail and I imagine that is where the name comes from. The male and female look completely different. A male Restart is one of the birds in the post “The Shy Warblers.” I tried to take a photo of a female Restart back then, but she didn’t stay still long enough. They are hectic birds. The male stopped to sing a couple of times and that is how I managed to take his photo. They also like to hide in the leaves in the trees. I was surprised to see the young female out in the open like that. She didn’t stay there very long. She was passing through and stopped on the fence for a moment. Photographing birds is good exercise for my attention and reflexes. Here one moment and gone the next! 🙂

      • zirah1 says:

        Thanks for all the input. I am so impressed w/ all your knowledge of various birds….and your patience to photograph them! Your patience and good reflexes are our/your readers’ gain, so to speak. 🙂

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Diane 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you liked the photos. 🙂 The young birds are interesting to watch. They have to learn and eat a lot quickly to get big enough before the cold weather sets in.

  4. Your pictures leave me in awe, Sarah!! Wow do you have a knack to capture birds. I LOVE the mural effect (the blended effect) in the background on some images which just made that bird pop. Terrific shooting and terrific editing! Great job!!! 🤗

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Amy 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! I am happy you enjoyed the photos. 🙂 I find the birds endlessly entertaining. They are also good teachers of patience, persistence, attention, and living each day with courage and enthusiasm! 🙂

      • All of Nature to me are Teachers, Sarah. I have learned so much just from observing. Some day I hope to have enough time just to sit with my camera to capture birds. Many come in our backyard to the feeders. I’ve tried to capture them while in the forests but I’m am definitely not good at it (yet). LOL

        • Sarah says:

          Photographing the birds at your bird feeder sounds like a good project for the winter. Who are the characters in the daily feeder drama? 🙂

          • Blue Jays, Cardinals, Crows, and Sparrows mainly. And at times with winter thaws we see squirrels. 😉

          • What about you? Who is in your drama?

            • Sarah says:

              Unfortunately, I don’t have bird feeders. I live in an apartment. I thought about putting bird feeders on my balcony, but figured the apartment folks wouldn’t be very happy about it. 🙂 There is a line of trees that I can see out of my windows. The tree line is maybe 50 feet away from my windows. I am not that good at judging distance. The birds frequent the trees and the bushes in the winter so I get to hear them chirping if I crack the window open and see them if I go outside. I also see birds if I bundle up and walk around the block. The birds I see around here in the winter are blue jays, cardinals, crows, song sparrows, American tree sparrows, house sparrows, gold finches, house finches, chickadees, downy woodpeckers, red-tailed hawks, white-breasted nuthatches, juncos, red-bellied woodpeckers, starlings and …. I think that is all. I might have left someone out. Once, I thought I saw a purple finch, but I wasn’t sure. Two years ago when I was out in the park next door, I saw a couple of bald eagles in the tall old cottonwood tree. That was a sight to remember!! They forage over land when the water is mostly frozen in the rivers and the lakes. When I visited Jester Park in the middle of last winter, I saw tufted titmouses at the bird feeders, but I haven’t seen any around where I live in either the summer or the winter. The American tree sparrows are one of my favorites. 🙂 They come down here for the winter. They spend the summer in the far north. They are very active social birds and travel in large flocks. They hang out with the juncos and song sparrows and eat the seeds of the flowers and grasses. If you pay attention, there is still a lot of activity in the winter especially on the sunny days. 🙂

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