The Bunting And The Goldfinch

A mystery bird sang from the tree next to the Great St. Johnswort flowers while I was watching the bees at the end of June. I could hear his cheerful melody. When I looked up, the music appeared to be coming from the leaves.

I listened and watched until I saw him. He is an immature male indigo bunting. In the spring, I saw a fully grown male indigo bunting for the first time. He was in the bushes and the trees on the road to the pond by the lake. When I was watching the house wrens, I saw another one. They were both too far away for photographs.

This young one flies a circuit that includes the garden, the trees across the road and places I don’t know. I hear his song move around and then fade for a while before he comes back.

On Sunday morning, he rested for a moment on an evergreen in the garden so I could take his portrait. He is slightly larger than the goldfinches. He spent Sunday chasing a male goldfinch around the garden in between singing and looking for food.

The goldfinch was persistent and came back to sing his song again.

July 2, 2017

An American goldfinch singing in the garden at Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An American goldfinch in the garden at Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An indigo bunting in the garden at Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An indigo bunting in the garden at Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An American goldfinch by the pond in the bison and the elk enclosure at Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An American goldfinch singing and grooming in Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017.

An American goldfinch singing in Jester Park, Iowa, July 2, 2017. An indigo bunting and a northern cardinal sing in the background.

July 5, 2017

An indigo bunting singing at sunrise in the fog, Jester Park, Iowa, July 5, 2017.

An indigo bunting singing in Jester Park, Iowa, July 5, 2017. Other birds sing and chatter in the background.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

 

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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14 Responses to The Bunting And The Goldfinch

  1. Such gorgeous birds… wonderful to listen to their birdsongs! Thanks for sharing. πŸ™‚

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    I really like the bunting photograph. How far away were you when you took it?

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! He is a handsome bird, isn’t he? πŸ™‚ Eventually, he will be all blue except for black stripes on his wings. He is a very enthusiastic singer! I was following him here and there hoping for a photograph. He kept choosing places too high or hidden in the leaves. Then, he stopped in a small evergreen tree on the edge of the garden. I think he likes that tree because I saw him there a few times. I am not sure how far away I was maybe 15 feet or perhaps 20 feet.

  3. I love the bunting! We have tons of goldfinches where I live but I have never seen the bunting! Beautiful pictures!

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! The indigo bunting is a brilliant blue and he chose the evergreen tree for his perch to show off his feathers. Or so I imagine. πŸ™‚ The indigo buntings like the areas on the edge of the woods. This is the first year I have seen them. Where I have lived in the past and now has been more open with trees here and there, but not woods. I love the goldfinches as well. They fly around here in flocks and chatter their happy songs. It was interesting to watch the bunting chase the goldfinch. The young bunting evidently has decided the garden is his territory! The goldfinch didn’t seem too bothered by it. He flew right back and started singing again. πŸ™‚

  4. zirah1 says:

    Love the color of the bunting! Don’t think I’ve ever seen one before.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kindness! It is a pretty blue. πŸ™‚ I was happy to see the young one flying around the garden singing his song where I could see him. This spring is the first time I remember seeing an indigo bunting. I think I would remember if I had seen one before. I was driving out from a visit to the pond near the lake and I saw a flash of blue fly across the road, stop for a moment and then disappear. “Who is this?” I wondered and spent time going through the bird book I have on my desk. Then, I went back and walked along the road a few times hoping I would see him again. I only did twice and both times from a distance too far for the camera and my eyes. I stopped walking that way and visiting the pond because it is summer now and there is a campsite along the road. I don’t want to be bothering the peace of those camping by driving by at such and early hour and walking around with my camera. One day when I was watching the wrens, I heard a bird chirping and went to investigate and it was in Indigo bunting who flew away quickly. I figured I was out of luck. And then, who should show up singing over my head while I was watching the bees? πŸ™‚

      • zirah1 says:

        Great story. It just shows how much it was meant to be that you and the bunting rendezvous sooner or later. p. s.Those campers don’t know how lucky they were that you were so considerate. πŸ™‚

        • Sarah says:

          I love it when the birds decide to be friendly and give me a chance. πŸ™‚

          • zirah1 says:

            Ah, the birds are no dummies, they recognize your sweet nature and the high level of appreciation you have for them.

            • Sarah says:

              That is very sweet of you to say. πŸ™‚ When I am still and relaxed, they go about their business around me from what they think of as a safe distance. I always say “thank you” when they decide to perch and sing where I can see them. πŸ™‚ I had another happy surprise on Sunday which will be the subject of the next post. πŸ™‚

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