You Are Already There

“You are already there where you wish to be,”

Sang the bird from the branch of the evergreen tree.

“I agree,” buzzed the bee as he flew to the flower.

Take heart, sweet child, for this is the hour.

When my Mom visited last May, we watched the birds at the bird feeders behind the Visitors Center at the Iowa Arboretum. A goldfinch watched us from the branches of an evergreen tree. He wanted to go back to the bird feeder, but was it safe? After some consideration, he decided it was.

On the way to the bird feeders, we spotted a Baltimore oriole singing from the tree tops. He would sing a few bars, fly to another tree, and then sing a few more. You can hear him singing in the video of the goldfinch at the bird feeder. He has a distinctive and lilting tune.

The following week, I heard a Baltimore oriole singing from the old cottonwood tree on the eastern end of the park next door. He flew southeast with cottonwood fluff in his beak. The birds like to weave the cottonwood fluff into their nests. A few days later, a Baltimore oriole was singing in a tree on the western end of the park. Were there two Baltimore oriole families in the neighborhood?

While I was straining to see the Baltimore oriole high in the old cottonwood tree, I heard a pretty little song. Nearly hidden in the bushes near the tree, a warbling vireo was singing.

The Baltimore oriole and the warbling vireo were friends or maybe they liked the same trees. A warbling vireo was flitting about in the branches behind the second Baltimore oriole in the tree on the western end of the park. I followed her as she darted here and there. In one of the morning’s photographs, she was at her nest. I couldn’t find the nest when I looked for it later. There were many places for clever birds to hide their nests in the tree.

A month later, I was watching the barn swallows collect mud and twigs for their nests from a puddle in the parking lot near the tree on the western end of the park (“Imagination”). I heard chirping. Warbling vireos were collecting bugs to feed their young. I didn’t realize I had seen the young bird until I looked at the photographs. The nest was well hidden.

The photograph of the bumble bee was taken in September 2015 at the Iowa Arboretum. My Mom and I were admiring the butterflies on the flowers of the seven-son flower tree (“September Butterflies”). The bumble bees liked the flowers as much as the butterflies did. Neither the butterflies nor the bumble bees were interested in us. They were preoccupied with the flowers.

September 14, 2015

A bumble bee on a seven-son flower tree at the Iowa Arboretum, September 14, 2015.

May 17, 2016

A Baltimore oriole at the Iowa Arboretum, May 17, 2016.

A Baltimore oriole singing at the Iowa Arboretum, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at the Iowa Arboretum, Iowa, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at the Iowa Arboretum, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at the Iowa Arboretum, Iowa, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at the Iowa Arboretum, Iowa, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at the Iowa Arboretum, Iowa, May 17, 2016.

An American goldfinch at a bird feeder in the Iowa Arboretum, May 17, 2016. A Baltimore oriole sings in the background.

May 23, 2016

A Baltimore oriole in the old cottonwood tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 23, 2016.

A warbling vireo singing in a bush near the old cottonwood tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 23, 2016.

A warbling vireo singing in a bush near the old cottonwood tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 23, 2016.Β 

May 28, 2016

A Baltimore oriole in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 28, 2016. The Baltimore orioles had a nest in the tree.

A Baltimore oriole in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 28, 2016. The Baltimore orioles had a nest in the tree.

A Baltimore oriole in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 28, 2016. The Baltimore orioles had a nest in the tree.

A warbling vireo at her nest in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, May 28, 2016.

June 24, 2016

A warbling vireo with food for her young in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 24, 2016.

A warbling vireo near her nest in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 24, 2016. The nest with one visible young warbling vireo is in the bottom right of the photograph.

June 25, 2016

A warbling vireo in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo in a tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

American goldfinches in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

 

 

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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12 Responses to You Are Already There

  1. zirah1 says:

    Especially love the picture of the finch at the top of the post. What colors….so dramatic! I have at least two pairs of finches that are always fighting for “dibs” on the thistle feeder I have. I think the males use up all their energy chasing each other, so whatever fuel they get from the thistle almost immediately gets burned up. πŸ™‚

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting, your kind thoughts and sharing the story! I love hearing the bird stories. πŸ™‚ Goldfinches are a lot of fun to watch. I see flocks of them here often weaving in the trees never staying in one place very long.

  2. zirah1 says:

    p. s. Sweet poem at the beginning of the post.

    • Sarah says:

      I am happy you like it. πŸ™‚ It was an intuition story that floated in one evening while I was doing the dinner dishes. Then, I went to find photos to go with. And wouldn’t you know I had some. πŸ™‚

  3. Wonderful photos of such colourful and golden birds. It is amazing how gold the American goldfinch is to our European one, just a flash on ours. I’ve still to see the golden Orioles at my friends Finca. They are so high up on poplar trees but can be heard! I haven’t received your email yet so wonder if I gave the right address. georginawright@blueyonder.co.uk. Look forward to hearing from you and more of your wonderful posts.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Georgina πŸ™‚

      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! I am happy you enjoyed the photos of the birds. The goldfinches are a very pretty yellow in the summer. I see them flying in flocks when I walk around here. They are like rays of sunshine weaving through the trees. πŸ™‚ I heard the Baltimore oriole last summer more times than I saw him. I would hear him singing down the tree line next to my apartment like I hear the cardinals. A flash of orange and then he’d be gone.

      I wonder what happened to the email I sent you on Friday. That’s curious. I just checked and it tells me that it was sent to the email you listed. I wonder if it went into a spam file somewhere along the way. I will try sending another email. I am looking forward to reading the beginning chapters of your story. πŸ™‚

  4. Shady_Grady says:

    Love the goldfinch pictures!

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! I am happy you like the goldfinch pictures. πŸ™‚ He was putting on a show. He wanted the food from the feeder, but he didn’t feel comfortable enough with us there to take more than a bite before looking back again. πŸ™‚

  5. birdlady612 says:

    Beautiful pictures and story. I can’t wait for our weather to break so I can sit outside and listen to and watch the birds. I love gardening for this reason.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! I know what you mean. πŸ™‚ I have had the kitchen window open so I can hear the bird singing even when it is raining. Love to hear their sweet voices! πŸ™‚ I think the goldfinches are starting to change their feathers here. I saw one up in the trees last weekend that looked like he was in mid-change. There is all kinds of chattering and singing going on in the bushes by the little birds that I rarely see.

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