The Rabbits

A rabbit watching from the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016

A cottontail rabbit watching from the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016.

While I was watching the birds last summer, the cottontail rabbits were watching me. They peered out from their hiding places, bounded across the pavement, and nibbled on the grass.

Last June, I spotted a robin on a nest in a small tree in the parking lot of the park next door. I was walking around the block for exercise. I checked on the nest for a couple of weeks until the little ones left. At the same time, the cedar waxwings were busy building a nest nearby. The robins and the cedar waxwings will have their own posts.

On the other side of the park, the warbling vireos had hidden their nest in a tall tree. The warbling vireos are only 5 1/2 inches long which is slightly smaller than the song sparrows.

Meadowlarks singing with other birds chirping and singing in the background, June 25, 2016.

American robins, northern cardinals, and dickcissels singing with other birds chirping and singing in the background, June 28, 2016.

June 18, 2016

A cottontail rabbit in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016.

An American robin at her nest in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016.

An American robin at her nest in the park next door, Iowa, June 18, 2016.

June 25, 2016

A cottontail rabbit watching from the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit watching from the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit running in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit running in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo singing from a tall tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo singing from a tall tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo in a tall tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

A warbling vireo in a tall tree in the park next door, Iowa, June 25, 2016.

June 28, 2016

A cottontail rabbit inspecting the grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, June 28, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit investigating the grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, June 28, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, June 28, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating the grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, June 28, 2016.

July 1, 2016

A cedar waxwing family in the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

A cedar waxwing family in the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit watching from the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit watching from the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating the grass in the parking lot of the park next door, Iowa, July 1, 2016.

July 30, 2016

A cottontail rabbit eating grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit watching from the edge of the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit watching from the edge of the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating grass in the park next door, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit eating the grass in the park next door, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit hiding in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cottontail rabbit hiding in the grass in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cup-plant flower in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

A cup-plant flower in the park next door, Iowa, July 30, 2016.

Cottontail rabbits in the park next door, Iowa, Summer 2016 (June 25, June 28, July 1, and July 30)

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and runner
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10 Responses to The Rabbits

  1. Shady_Grady says:

    It’s a good thing my dog didn’t see those rabbits! 🙂
    I like how well the waxwing nest is hidden, which I guess is the point.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady 🙂
      Thanks for visiting! It is good that your dog didn’t see the rabbits. 🙂 There are many dogs that go for walks with their owners in the park or by the park. I imagine the rabbits have a lot of practice running away and hiding from them. Some of the rabbits were shy and ran away when they spotted me. Others were non-nonchalant about it and continued with their activities.
      It was fun and interesting to watch the cedar waxwings build their nest. 🙂 The robin nest was already built by the time I noticed it. I saw the cedar waxwings build the nest because I noticed one fly to the tree while I was watching the robins. The tree with the cedar waxwing nest is only one tree removed from the end near the water park. The area is busy with people activity during the day in the summer. The cedar waxwings managed to raise their little ones in spite of it. You had to look up into the tree carefully or see them fly in to notice it. They built it very well. Both the robin nest and the cedar waxwing nest are still there even after all the windy days of fall and winter.

  2. zirah1 says:

    Great pictures! I always love when I happen to spy a rabbit out in the front or back yard where I live, or when I am out on my walks thru the neighborhood. Often I almost get so close I could step on them because they blend in so well, and it’s not until they make a quick movement that I notice they’re even there.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kind words! It is interesting how the rabbits hide in plain sight. 🙂 I think they are fun to watch. I see them often in the warm months. I haven’t seen one in a while. It has been warmer here the last couple of days and I can feel my excitement for spring building. 🙂

      • zirah1 says:

        HA! Yes, hide in plain sight….they are masters of that technique. And I’m starting to notice more daffodils and crocus blooming on my walks thru the neighborhood. Hoping that we don’t have another blast of Arctic-like weather like we did on Thur to put the kabosh on things.

        • Sarah says:

          Seeing the first plant shoots of spring is exciting. 🙂 You are a little ahead of here. Hopefully, the flowers will be successful in their spring journey to blossoms. 🙂 They don’t usually start coming up here until March. It could easily still snow again. Spring is just around the corner, though. I can feel it. I think the birds are chirping more. It has been warm enough to open my window a few times. I love the fresh air. I haven’t been to park on the lake and walked through the woods there since early January. I might go this coming weekend to see what is happening.

          • zirah1 says:

            Hey, it could easily still snow here, too. It’s happened as late as the end of March before and I know we’ve still got more winter coming. Unfortunately what happens in this area is we have just enough early spring-like weather that it gets things blooming and then cold weather comes in and ruins it all. Hopefully that won’t be the case this year, but……

            • Sarah says:

              It does seem a bit early to make it until spring without more frost or snow. I am curious when the first wildflowers arrive in the woods here. Last spring, I was staking out the pond in the park next door in the mornings during February and March watching for migrating ducks. I saw a few. I think there are too many dogs whose owners let them run free in the park for the ducks to stay there overnight. This spring, I am going to try looking for the migrating ducks in the pond next to the lake in Jester Park (the park by the lake) and also check the woods there for wildflowers. It is a 40 minute drive so I can’t check it as regularly as the pond that is right on the other side of the trees.

  3. Wonderful video – those rabbits seems so tame and content compared to the wild ones here – they dart off very quickly. However, we do live in the middle of the fox-hunting shires here, so I think the smart ones learn fast.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi 🙂
      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! I imagine the foxes along with the dogs do put speed into the rabbits. 🙂 There are dogs that run in the park and chase the rabbits here sometimes and I have seen a fox a couple of times in the very early morning. Most of the time, though, the rabbits only have to contend with people who generally leave them alone and dogs on leashes. I think it is interesting how they will “hide” on the edge of the grass perfectly still pretending they are invisible. 🙂

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