Stillness

A migrating greater yellowlegs in a pond near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.To be still is to know the mystery.

The heavy fog drifted over the lake on the morning of the third Friday in October. It hid the water and the cliffs along the bank. I watched it settle down on the nearby pond. In search of sunshine, I walked by the woods. The light danced in beams through the fall leaves.

In the bramble by the lake, a fox sparrow, a Lincoln’s sparrow, and a white-crowned sparrow gathered. They were all migrating through the area. I have only briefly glimpsed the fox sparrow and the Lincoln’s sparrow before. They are shy and prefer cover to open spaces.

Back at the pond, the fog lifted. A lone migrating greater yellowlegs searched for food.

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Evening primrose flowers on the bank of Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Evening primrose flowers on the bank of Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

An evening primrose flower on the bank of Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

An evening primrose flower on the bank of Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Fall leaves in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Fall leaves in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Sunlight breaking through the fog in the woods at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Milkweed pods and seeds at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Milkweed pods and seeds at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating fox sparrow near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating fox sparrow near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln's sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln’s sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln's sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln’s sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln's sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating Lincoln’s sparrow in the bramble by Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating white-crowned sparrow in the bramble near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating white-crowned sparrow in the bramble near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating white-crowned sparrow in the bramble near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating white-crowned sparrow in the bramble near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

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A migrating greater yellowlegs in a pond near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

A migrating greater yellowlegs in a pond near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

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A migrating greater yellowlegs in a pond near Saylorville Lake at Jester Park, Iowa, October 21, 2016.

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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15 Responses to Stillness

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind words! I am happy you liked the photos. πŸ™‚ It was like a dream walking through the fog that morning. πŸ™‚

  1. Zirah Hearn says:

    Wow, how lucky are we to have two posts from you w/in a short period of time?! Wonderful pictures and text. Would make a great set of greeting/note cards. Have you ever thought of submitting some of your pics to Birds & Blooms or some other publication? Or have some done as art prints or cards ….maybe thru Vistaprint or Cafe Press? And of course you can do your own. A number of yrs ago I made cards of my artwork and just needed a good printer, the right kind of stock paper and a program like Publisher.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting, your kind thoughts, and your suggestions! I very much appreciate the encouragement. πŸ™‚ Figuring out how to make prints for cards or pictures/posters from the photos is on this winter’s list. I am not going to be going out with the camera once the temperature drops below freezing this winter so that frees up some time. I will still be posting and, hopefully, more regularly. πŸ™‚ I know I have been haphazard about the posting times. I have intentions to post each week and then get carried away being outside! Fortunately, the photos don’t expire and they will all make their way into posts eventually. There are lots of fun ones to share over the winter. πŸ™‚ Do you have any of your artwork up online that I could see?

      • Zirah Hearn says:

        Well, I just found out something interesting. I was a featured artist about 6 yrs ago on Evolution Ezine and they did a “spread” on my visionary artwork that included about 6 or 7 paintings (watercolors), so it was always easy to send people wanting to see what I do the link to that page. I was going to do that for you, but apparently Evolution Ezine is now defunct, so I don’t have that as a resource to use anymore. :-(. There’s part of one painting on my websites’s Products & Services page, but it’s small and I now realize I need to change the link to the ezine article that’s listed there.. So thanks for helping me find out about that. πŸ™‚ http://evolutionmadeeasier.com/products–services.html

        • Sarah says:

          It is a pretty painting! πŸ™‚ I hope you put more of your work some place where it can be seen online and let me know the link. πŸ™‚

          • Zirah Hearn says:

            Maybe I will put together a page of some of them for the website. I use to have a page on my old website, but didn’t do it for the newer one because I would just send people to Evolution Ezine. Oh well, the times they are a changin’. πŸ™‚

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    You really have an eye for beauty. These pics are an oasis from all the noise of the outside world.
    I wonder why that Lincoln’s sparrow looks so worried?

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thank you for visiting and your kind thoughts! πŸ™‚ I am happy you find visiting peaceful. It means I have done what I intended to do. πŸ™‚
      The world is a big place for the little sparrows. πŸ™‚ I was lucky to be able to take the photos of the Lincoln’s sparrow. He really didn’t want to be seen. I have spotted them before in that area, but they are quick to hide. This is true about the fox sparrow as well. Moments after that photo, he flew further away and down into the plant stalks.

  3. Such a good record of your migrating birds. Where do they go to, Texas, Mexico? Ours head across the Sahara to various parts of Africa.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      If it was up to me, I would happily wander around after the birds recording their where-bouts and keeping them company. πŸ™‚ Something tells me they don’t feel like they need my company as much as I enjoy theirs! Most of the birds migrate to the southern US, Mexico, and into Central America. The barn swallows go as far as South America. They leave earlier, though, in the beginning of September. The white-crowned sparrow doesn’t go very far. This area could even be on the northern edge of its range. It is hard to tell on the map. I have only seen then in the spring and the fall. It might be they like places like the park on the lake better than the trees and land near where I live. They spend the summer in northern Canada. The Lincoln’s sparrow goes down to the southern US and Mexico and out to the southeast and west coasts.

      • That’s really interesting and it seems to parallel the migratory birds here in Europe. Our swallows go all the way to Southern Africa! And some other birds have a shorter distance but the Sahara forces many to fly further too. Is there such a decline in migratory birds as there is here? My story features these birds and I call them messenger birds.

        • Sarah says:

          There are birds who are endangered due to habitat loss at the various places they live here. I don’t have a very good memory for names of birds unless they are ones I have seen or recently read about. Right now, I have a wish to see snow geese. I think this will have to wait for the spring or next fall and some investigation on my part about where I can go to see them. πŸ™‚ I think I saw a few fly overhead when I was in the park next door watching the muskrats in February. They flew by quickly and it peaked my curiosity. A few weeks ago, I took a trip over to the DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge on the Missouri River with the hope of seeing them. They weren’t flying through that day. The drive is a couple of hours so I can’t visit regularly like with the park on the lake or next door. I might go once more this year.

          • Sounds interesting and I think it is difficult to find out about declines in numbers. Unfortunately I read today of a snow goose tragedy in a blizzard and they landed in a contaminated lake. Not their usual route. We can only hope that enough can be done to ensure the survival of wild species.

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