A Solitary Robin

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

“Would you like your picture taken?” I asked her.

She took a few steps down the hill closer to me and tilted her head.

Twice, she flew up to the branch of a bush taller than the grasses and called. There was no reply. The second time, she flew away in the direction of the old cottonwood tree.

“Thank you,” I whispered as I watched her go.

I looked around for other robins or songbirds. There were none. Perhaps, she missed the signs of the flock leaving. I rarely see solitary songbirds. They travel in flocks for company and protection from the predators. The old cottonwood tree is a gathering place for the birds. I hope she made the journey safely. I saw two hawks flying across the sky as I walked home.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

An American Robin at dusk, February 15, 2016.

Take care and thanks for reading

Sarah

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
This entry was posted in Nature and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to A Solitary Robin

  1. zirah1 says:

    Thanks for sharing! Great pics.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Zirah πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! The robin was a happy sight yesterday evening. πŸ™‚ While I was watching her, a rabbit hopped up on my right. When the rabbit caught sight of me, she zoomed up the hill. I didn’t notice the rabbit until I saw her white tail bouncing up the hill. Rabbits can really move when they want to. πŸ™‚ They are shy and I have yet to manage a photograph of one of them.

      • zirah1 says:

        That’s happened to me when I go for walks. There will be a rabbit that is very close by, but I don’t even see them until they make a run for it. p.s. We’ve had a bunch of robins around lately. I think all the birds here (and me, too!) are ready for spring to arrive.

        • Sarah says:

          I have been listening for the birds in the morning and evening, but it has been pretty quiet so far. I can’t remember when it is that they start singing every morning. I have noticed the sunrise is earlier which is a good sign. πŸ™‚ When the grass turns green, I see robins hopping about in the lawn outside of my window. They seem to be keeping a low profile still. I see their silhouettes in the trees and bushes on the edge of the park. The robin yesterday was in the grasses on the side of the hill by the water tower. I often see birds there in the winter since it faces south and the wind usually comes from the north. They don’t mow the hill and there are plenty of seeds. Yesterday, it was just the one robin and the rabbit. I saw rabbit tracks in the snow and thought I should watch for them, but when the rabbit appeared it was too fast! I am ready for spring as well. πŸ™‚

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    Those are good pictures.
    Are the female robins a different size or color than the male ones?
    I wonder if the hawks were following the robin.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind thoughts! I went out on Monday evening to see if I could take photos of the muskrat homes. There were clouds covering the sun on the western horizon. It was too dark for photos there. I walked over to the stand of trees by the water tower since I have seen birds there before in the trees and on the hill outside of the trees. I was happy to see the robin hopping about looking for food. πŸ™‚ She didn’t seem too worried about me, but I don’t think she realized she was alone. When she figured it out, she left. Male robins have solid red in the front and less or no darker patch on their beaks.
      The hawks have very good eyesight. I have tried to take their photograph and haven’t managed it yet. I can’t get close enough with the camera before they fly away. I have stopped following them around. πŸ™‚ There could have been a hawk watching the robin when she was flying. The two hawks I saw were flying by the line of trees on the edge of the park away from the cottonwood tree. There are many hawks around here and they sometimes perch in the cottonwood tree and other trees nearby. When the songbirds are in flocks, they can warn one another or gang up on the hawk. A songbird flying on its own isn’t very safe. I followed her with my eyes as far as I could and she was okay. My eyes aren’t good enough to see her all the way to the tree.

      • Shady_Grady says:

        πŸ™‚ I looked it up. Apparently hawks and eagles have eyes so much better than humans that they can see an ant crawling on the ground from a 10 story building. They also have a much wider field of vision. So they are probably joking with each other pretending they haven’t seen you trying to take their picture. And then just before you get close enough, they leave. I’m sure it much be funny..if you are a hawk.

        • Sarah says:

          That is really good eyesight! Thanks for looking it up and letting me know. πŸ™‚ I stopped trying to photograph the hawks and the eagles about this time last year. It was fun to try. Seeing the bald eagles flying in to perch in the cottonwood tree for a while was an experience even if they were too far away to photograph well with my camera. I think it is interesting that the hawks who are the smallest of the trio of hawks, eagles, and owls have the largest do-not-approach distance. The owls I saw two years ago in the spring let me come relatively close before they decided to take flight. I haven’t seen the owls since early summer that year. I don’t think the collection of trees here was enough of a woods for them. I might make a post from the bald eagle photos and videos at some point. They would stop by around 5 to 10 minutes before sunrise so there wasn’t very much light in addition to the distance.

  3. That was so charming to ask for permission. My friend Ruth whose photos of trees I am using asked some pigs for permission to photo once. Permiso! Beautiful and clear shots and different from the European robin.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi πŸ™‚
      Thanks for visiting and your kind words! The little robin was being friendly. πŸ™‚ Truth be told, I talk to the birds and other animals I encounter often. I try to not do it when other people are around, though, because I am not sure they would understand. πŸ™‚ I always say thank you since I am very thankful that they have let me share in their story for the length of our visit. I looked up the European robin and they do look different than the ones here. I am getting better at identifying birds by their beaks and other features. I saw quite a few birds last year that I hadn’t seen before.
      Today, I heard a house finch singing outside of the window, but I couldn’t see where he was in the trees.
      Yesterday, I saw a pair of tundra swans flying overhead while I was watching a pair of muskrats by the pond in the park next door. It was the first time I had seen the tundra swans. It took me a moment to realize they weren’t Canadian geese. I see flocks of Canadian geese every time I am out. I could see the tundra swans out of the corner of my eye and they sounded different and the shape was a little different so I looked up. And then my mind went….. wait a minute… who are you?!? πŸ™‚ I took a few blurry photos as they flew north. I looked them up when I got home. They spend the winter on the east and west coast and the summer in the arctic. The migration path of the ones from the east coast goes by here. I am surprised migration starts this early. So, now, I will be paying extra attention to the birds I see close to the ground and over my head. πŸ™‚

      • Yes,We spot vultures when we go to turn the solar panels and are forced to look up. They move over quite fast really and never there if you want to show someone! Great to see the migratory swans. In the UK Whooper and Bewick come to stay for winter. Our Robin redbreast is very popular on Christmas cards!

        • Sarah says:

          The European robin is a pretty bird! I wanted to ask the tundra swans to slow down and come back so I could get a closer look, but they were intent on their journey. πŸ™‚ I will be keeping an eye out for other ones. It is fun to see birds I normally wouldn’t if only for a moment or two.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s