Let It Snow!

First snow of the winter, Dec 2013.

First snow of the winter, Dec 2013.

Snowy running track, Dec 2013.

Snowy running track, Dec 2013.

Winter running shoes, Dec 2013.

Winter running shoes, Dec 2013.

Snowflakes in motion, Dec 2013.

Snowflakes in motion, Dec 2013.

It was a snowy 4 plus mile run. The temperature was around 20 degrees with very little wind. It seemed pleasant compared to the bitter cold of recent days. I had a lot of fun!

Here is a picture of the cottonwood tree in the early summer. It seems like just yesterday.

Cottonwood Tree, June 2013

Cottonwood Tree, June 2013

Take care and thanks for reading.

Sarah

About Sarah

nature, outdoor, and health enthusiast, book reader, and story teller
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6 Responses to Let It Snow!

  1. Shady_Grady says:

    I can’t imagine running in the snow. I like being outside in the fall but not the winter.
    My dog loves the snow however and would stay out in the back yard/woods for hours if I let her.

    • Sarah says:

      Hi Shady 🙂

      I did notice some dog tracks last night on part of the sidewalk 🙂 I would like to adopt a dog that loves to be outside as much as I do. Maybe some day I will.

      Last night when I was running, I was thinking about how much warmer I felt running than I did during the day in my apartment. I find after the first mile I feel warmer than I do during the rest of the day minus the time spent under the pile of covers. I was thinking this morning about a post on cold weather running tips. The first of those would be covering ears, nose, mouth, and head. I didn’t used to do this. I would wear a pair of ear muffs and put my hood up if it was really cold and maybe cover my mouth with the scarf. It bothered my sinuses a lot. Now, I throw any regard I might have for style to the wind and wear a fleece hat that has a visor that covers my nose and mouth. If it is cold enough like it is now, I put the hood up as well. It has made a big difference in my enjoyment level on the cold weather runs. And I think my sinuses appreciate it as well.

      What did you think of the fourth picture? I couldn’t tell what I was taking a picture of with the camera on my phone last night because it was dark. I just aimed it at the tree and clicked. I know those are snowflakes making the paths of light, but if you didn’t know that, it might make you wonder what is out there that the eye doesn’t see…..

      • Sarah says:

        I find that tree to be impressive at all times of the year. I believe it is a cottonwood tree. It does look much happier in the summer with its leaves. I think it looks majestic, sturdy and solid in the winter months, but I agree that picture does look ominous. (Actually, running at night in the dark makes everything look rather ominous truth be told.) I don’t know how to estimate its age. There must be some kind of correlation between age and height, but I haven’t looked. And I can’t decide how tall it is. There isn’t anything nearby to use as a gauge. It is on a small creek which is mostly run off water and one of the few small areas around here that hasn’t been landscaped. A couple of years, I have noticed that it was home to a family of red-tailed hawks during the warmer months. I run by it all the time and I saw the nest one year before the leaves covered it up, heard the little ones crying for their parents, and watched them in their first attempts at flight.

      • Sarah says:

        I have a picture of the tree from the summer that I am going to try attaching to this email/reply. I don’t know if it will work, though 🙂 The smaller tree in the foreground is taller than I am by a few feet at least and I am 5′ 8″ so that gives some idea of the height of the cottonwood tree. It looks more impressively tall in person than it does in the picture.

        ps. It doesn’t seem like I can put a picture in a comment so I put it at the end of the post.

  2. Shady_Grady says:

    That is a pretty stark difference between winter and summer. It is amazing that plants can “die” and come back to life.

    • Sarah says:

      I looked at the file and it says that picture of the cottonwood tree is from June 9th. Everything still had the bright green of spring. I remember that morning. The run started out overcast with a slight drizzle and by the end it was bright sunshine. I was playing around taking pictures with the camera on the phone since it was new and I hadn’t figure out what it was capable of yet. It is amazing how the plants go dormant in the winter and then come back in the spring. I find it inspirational no matter how many times I see it happen.

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